Best Gluten-Free Pizza Crust, Gluten-Free Goddess Style

Gluten free pizza crust - my new recipe
My best gluten-free pizza crust to date.

For years I've missed pizza. Not because there isn't gluten-free pizza available. It's out there. You can find it if you look hard enough. Take a gander in the frozen food aisle of your favorite natural market. Snoop around in the dairy case, next to the gluten-free bagels. You might even hit pay dirt at your local pizza joint (if they understand the ins and outs of cross contamination). So yeah. There are some choices out there. Problem is, most gluten-free pizza sucks.

It's usually heavy on the chewy aspect. Or dry as dirt. With zero flavor. Yawningly bland. Certainly nothing to brag about. I mean, you wouldn't eat it if you didn't have to. You know what I'm sayin'? It's okay in a pinch. If you're famished on a Friday night. But it's not exactly inspiring.

So last week I started experimenting. I tweaked and baked. And lo and behold. A new gluten-free pizza crust was born.

And this one doesn't suck.



Gluten free pizza crust baked to a golden brown and topped with Italian veggies
This pizza crust is so tasty you don't need a red sauce.

Karina's Best Gluten-Free Pizza Crust Recipe

Originally published Febuary 2011.

I'm finally happy with a gluten-free pizza crust. It's the best gluten-free dairy-free pizza crust I've eaten. These particular flours bring superior flavor and a perfect pizza crust texture. Slightly golden crisp at the edge, with a tender, flexible middle. Not too thick and not too thin. You can hold a slice in your hand and bite.

Ingredients:

1 cup tapioca starch
1 cup sorghum flour
1 cup potato starch
1/2 cup brown rice flour
1/2 cup GF millet flour
3 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 teaspoon fine sea salt
3 tablespoons organic light brown sugar
1 and 1/4 cups warm water (between 110 - 115ºF)
1 teaspoon organic light brown sugar - for proofing the yeast
1 packet (1/4 ounce) active dry yeast
1/4 cup good olive oil
1/4 cup beaten organic free-range egg whites (or egg replacer for two eggs)
1/4 teaspoon light tasting rice vinegar

Instructions:

Grease two 12-inch pizza pans (or baking sheets) and dust lightly with gluten-free cornmeal or rice flour. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the GF flours and dry ingredients.

Proof the yeast in 1 cup warm water with a pinch of sugar.

Add the proofed yeast and water to the dry ingredients. Add the oil, eggs and vinegar.

Beat the dough until smooth and sticky. Add the remaining 1/4 cup water if you need to. The pizza dough should be creamy smooth and not too thick- it's not sturdy like typical bread dough. It almost borders on batter.

Using a silicone spatula divide the dough in half. Scoop each half onto the center of a prepared pizza pan. Using clean, wet hands press down lightly and flatten the dough to create a thin, even pizza shell, with slightly raised edges. You'll have to rinse your hands more than once to do this. Take your time to smooth out the dough with wet palms. Have patience, Bubela. You will be rewarded with a lovely crust. Promise.

Set the pizza shells in a warm cozy spot to rest and rise a bit- about 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400ºF.

When the oven is hot, place the two pizza pans side by side on the center rack (if your oven is too small to accommodate both pans on one rack, you'll need to use two racks; rotate the pans half way through baking time to avoid overcooking on the lower rack).

Bake for ten minutes till golden.

Remove from the oven. Preheat the broiler.

Brush the pizza shell with extra virgin olive oil. Season with sea salt and fresh garlic.

Sprinkle with Italian herbs.

Top with your choice of fresh vegetables and herbs (and sauce, cheese, cooked meat etc). Drizzle extra virgin olive oil all over the top.

Broil briefly to melt the cheese, 4-5 minutes. Don't over cook

Makes two medium thick 12-inch pizzas or baking sheet style rectangles (a thinner crust makes a larger size).



 photo Print-Recipe.png




Recipe Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you.





Italian style gluten free pizza dough baked to a tender crust and topped with fresh grilled eggplant and vegan cheese
My new gluten-free pizza crust has a tender texture and fabulous taste.

Karina's Notes:


If you prefer a very thin crust, press it out thin on a larger cookie sheet; or divide the dough into three balls and use for three thin pizzas.

For a vegan pizza I used: fresh baby spinach leaves and basil, roasted eggplant slices, sliced fresh tomatoes, vegan "mozzarella" cheese, Italian herbs (dried oregano, marjoram, parsley, rosemary, thyme).

We had two slices of leftover pizza, so I experimented for you, Dear Reader. We wrapped leftover slices in foil and stored them in the fridge. The next morning, we reheated the wrapped slices in a 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes. They heated through rather quickly. Scrumptious for breakfast!

Regarding substitutions on a gluten-free diet...

I worked with my dough for several years to get just the right pizza crust texture and taste. This recipe is so perfect as is, I hesitate to offer any substitutions. Each change will impact the dough. If you change things up I cannot guarantee you'll achieve the lovely texture and taste of this latest incarnation. Any experimenting- you'll have to do on your own. Use my recipe as a guideline.

The flours I chose are balanced for a blend of just the right crispness, flavor, browning ability and flexibility. The brown sugar and extra virgin olive oil are there for a reason. They add complexity and richness to the gluten-free dough. If you remove them you'll impact the flavor and texture. Trust me.

If you prefer pizza sporting a red sauce, prepare the shell as above and bake it for only 6-7 minutes. Add the sauce and bake for three minutes. Add the additional topping and broil briefly to melt the cheese and heat the toppings.


Gluten free pizza crust recipe by Karina
A gluten-free crust worthy of your best toppings.

More gluten-free pizza crust recipes from food bloggers:


Shirley's Flourless, Gluten-Free Pizza at GFE

The Baking Beauties Easy Gluten-Free Pizza Crust

Gluten-Free Homemaker's Gluten-Free Pizza Crust - Single Recipe

The Sensitive Pantry's Potato Cauliflower Pizza Crust


xox Karina

161 comments:

Jackie said...

Absolutely beautiful, as always, and congrats on finally having a wonderful home-cooked pizza experience! Millet isn't kind to my belly as bean flour isn't kind to yours, but perhaps I can work around that. I do miss pizza for sure--and coming from an Italian family, it can be difficult at times! :-)

Anonymous said...

There is a reason you are call the goddess! I cannot wait to try this when my oven is working (I know gluten free with a non working oven~ eek). I have to admit I have given up on wanting to try another failure, but I know you and your recipes and I trust if you say it doesn't suck then it must not. There are only a couple things I really miss since going gluten free and pizza is one of them. There is a local place that makes a good one but it has dairy in it (a no for the little ones). So I have hope again of having pizza night with my kids. Thank you!

Erin Farrell Speer said...

Beautiful. I too was a pizza girl, and have had quite the tough time since I've gone gluten free and (mostly) dairy free. There is a local pizza place that makes a good GF pizza, but since eliminating the dairy, even this is a no go.

Can't wait to try this crust with some non-dairy cheese.

Thanks for the inspiration!!!!!!

Valerie @ City|Life|Eats said...

This looks absolutely gorgeous! As I recall you did not like Daiya, may I ask which vegan mozzarella you used?

Karina Allrich said...

Thanks, Jackie. I imagine you can sub the millet successfully. Good luck! Stop back and report.

Erin- Nice to meet another Pizza Girl. For a vegan, dairy-free crust, this one has so much flavor.

Hi Valerie! I use Vegan Gourmet. It works best when grated thin (larger shreds work for lasagna or other dishes you can cover with foil and bake). I drizzle it with olive oil to help it melt.

xox Karina

Annie Pazoo said...

Thank you Karina. I have been CRAVING pizza lately! Will have to try this

Jeanine said...

This pizza crust looks fantastic! I've had pretty good luck with pizza crust (after about a dozen horrible experiences), but I look forward to trying this one. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

I agree with anonymous above, that you aren't called a gluten-free goddess for nothing!!! I've tried your pumpkin bread, cranberry bread, multigrain bread, delicious bread, and soda bread, and I've been in 7th heaven since going GF 6 months ago. I can have bread again!! Now, I can have treats in the morning like my hubby. Thank you, Karina, for making the gluten-free journey easier for us mere mortals. I can't wait to try this pizza crust!
Layna, Montreal, Canada

Anonymous said...

Oh! the pizza lack has been killing me!!!!
Thank you thank you thank you, Karina, from the bottom of my gluten free heart.

Michelle said...

I know what we're having for dinner tomorrow!!

Kalyn said...

What a gorgeous recipe. All the pictures are great, but that last one is absolutely making me drool!

Karen Robertson said...

Karina,
A trick that works well is to put your hand into a plastic bag (a little sandwich bag works) pour a little olive oil on the dough and the bag and spread the dough easily without having to stop and wash your hands. Your flour combo is similar to what I am doing now with pizza which is 2 cups tapioca flour, 1 cup millet and 1 cup sorghum, it is truly the best yet by using sorghum and millet. Karen Robertson

gillian said...

Just last week I started crying while making another crappy gf pizza from a mix. (I'm 8-1/2 months pregnant, and I also used to host pizza nights with my perfect glutinous dough recipe. So emotional!)
I can't wait to use this recipe, devour gluten-free pizza, and smile!

Nancy said...

Looks spectacular, Karina! The ever elusive perfect gluten-free pizza crust may no longer be elusive. Whoopee! I crave good pizza. Can't wait to try this one.

Andres Cordova said...

Looks pretty SWEET! Gonna try this for sure.

TY Karina,

Andres Corova :)

dawn said...

Thank you so much. My husband (and the rest of our family) have been saved by having so many wonderful gluten-free recipes, that I have complete confidence in, in one place. We can't wait to try your new pizza crust recipe.

Noelle said...

This sounds fantastic. I have been so disappointed with many gf crusts. I want to make this soon! Thanks!

Lydia (The Perfect Pantry) said...

This is a recipe I'm going to bookmark for the times my GF friends come to dinner. Absolutely droolworthy photos, as always.

Christine said...

This looks delicious! It will probably take a while for me to accumulate the ingredients for the dough, and the courage to work with yeast, but I am definitely going to put this on my list of baking adventures! Thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

I can't tolerate sorghum flour-- can I use a mixture of teff and amaranth?

Karina Allrich said...

Thank you again, Everyone! You're the best. xox

Karen- Thanks for the oiled baggie tip! Brilliant.

Anon- Ive not yet baked with amaranth or teff flour. The taste might be off putting. So I'm not sure it would be a good sub.

Karina xox

gfe--gluten free easily said...

Totally fabulous, Karina! Beautiful pizza that you can eat for breakfast ... I am so game for that, dear. :-) Many thanks for linking to my flourless pizza ... a totally different kind of pizza, but still works for Pizza Friday, or the morning after. ;-)

xoxo,
Shirley

Kelly said...

Wow. That's all. :-)

pat @ gluten-free-around-the-world.com said...

Karina, I should learn not to read your blog when I'm hungry :)

This looks fabulous. I can't wait to try it with the vegan gourmet cheese, which I am happy to learn about. I hope it's casein free...

Pat

Iris said...

I was lucky enough to be living in NYC when I went gluten-free and there were some amazing gluten-free pizza places there. But it's so much more fun (and affordable) to be able to make your own. And that is one beautiful looking pizza!

Kayla said...

Thanks Karina for the wonderful recipe. I have not had pizza in ages ever since I was diagnosed with gluten intolerance. I might be able to have pizzas now:)

Carla said...

Egg whites! Great idea! Thanks you, as always!

flickm said...

beautiful blog, great entry, i wish i wasn't so lazy! this looks divine xxx

thenewstead6 said...

Wah! It is *SO* not fair that we can't get (guaranteed gluten free) sorghum flour in the UK :-( None of the Asian importers can guarantee it isn't contaminated and so far none of the specialist diet online stores stock it either. There is a real business opportunity out there for someone!!!

ikon said...

last week you had the dinner roll revelation, but you've been working on pizza dough for years? that just confused the hell out of me. it's rather irrelevant, but, y'know.

The InTolerant Chef said...

This sounds sooo good, the mix is well thought out, why mess with perfection? You've done all the hard work for us, thanks!

Jeanette said...

I've been looking for a good gluten-free pizza crust recipe and this sounds terrific. Pizza is one of the foods my son misses the most now that he is allergic to gluten, so thank you for this recipe!

Anonymous said...

Your experiences with GF pizza sound exactly like mine: depressing! I'll give your recipe a whirl. Have you tried putting a lightly oiled sheet of plastic wrap over the dough before patting it out? I've used it with other recipes and it works quite nicely and keeps the hands clean.

CassidyS said...

Wow-this looks great! I've never been able to make a good gluten-free pizza crust. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Good Morning Karina,

I so enjoy your blog and recipes, which by the way are worthy of being in a class of their own. I have been following you for the past six months or so, and I have this site as my homepage and always look forward to your next posting along with your intriguing tell-tale stories that would enthrall even the mere non-reading type.

It is great that we gluten-free folk can have pizza once again. I plan to make this on the weekend after I get restocked in tapioca flour.

Do you have a gluten-free cookbook or hopefully, you have one in the works.

Thanks again from your neighbor to the cold North.

Gail

Linda said...

It looks delicious, Karina! I use a similar blend of flours in my recipe, but have not tried adding millet. I'll have to do that and try brown sugar instead of white. I know how it feels to find a pizza recipe you are happy with. Once I did that, I didn't mind missing out on anything else. Thanks so much for linking to my recipe. You're a sweetheart!

Valerie @ City|Life|Eats said...

Hi Karina. Thank you for replying :) I am going to live Vegan Gourmet a try based on your tips :)

Karina Allrich said...

Thank you, Lovelies! I can't wait to make this pizza again. Friday Night Pizza is back! xox Karina

Anonymous said...

Karina - you have such wonderful beautiful recipes and I look forward to getting your posts! would it be possible to play with a pizza crust that does not use grains? I had read about making a pizza crust using potatoes - I tried it once, it worked, but...
I know I am not the only one who cannot use grains so you would be helping a ton of us!
thanks
Cindy

sea said...

This looks gorgeous and I love your toppings. I'm intrigued by the heavy tapioca starch content- I bet it gives it a very interesting texture. We will be trying this one for sure! I do have some pizza recipes I like, including an adaption of Carol Fenster's brown rice pizza and my amaranth crust, but I'm always happy to find new pizzas!

Here's mine, by the way. And I don't even ordinarily like amaranth!
http://www.bookofyum.com/blog/gluten-free-allergen-free-vegan-amaranth-flatbread-recipe-mix-5148.html

Yum yum!
-Sea

Cassiani said...

will definitely have to try this! i was a friday pizza chef from the age of 7 on- with extra thick crusty edges b/c i LoVED the bread! i quit trying years ago to replace this..... but especially post-birth, having recipes like this for my mother to whip up for me is so exciting!!!

THANKS!!!

thedustybaker.com said...

Hi Karina,

I love your site and so I’m passing along the STYLISH BLOGGER AWARD to you!

Check out my site for the post on what I’ve written up, including links to your site and why I think you’re incredible.

I’ll also be posting you on my Blogroll page when it’s up (soon!)

Hope you’re well and warm,
Jacqueline
thedustybaker.com

Mike said...

Nice! I just discovered Coconut Flour too... it'd be interesting to try in a pizza dough.

Anonymous said...

Am trying this dough tonight. Can't wait!! Just wondering...I can't have cane sugar...I put in date sugar but thinking that maybe honey might have been a better choice. & it seemed a little dry when I mixed it up, very crumbly. Added about an extra 1/8 cup water and seemed better. Any idea why that might have been? Still smells and looks yummy! Although...not as good as yours looks...always seems to be the way. Waiting for the rest of the family's real pizza's to bake so I can stick mine under the broiler. I've only been gluten free (and sugar, dairy & egg free) for a few months now. Hard when we do pizza night every week and I cannot have pizza!! Thanks for this recipe!!

Heather
heatheri@midmaine.com

Anonymous said...

Wow, this looks great! I can't have nightshades, dairy, or garlic, so I'm trying to brainstorm some toppings ... the spinach would be ok, and the basil, and maybe some kind of meat? I'll keep thinking on it.

janine

ellapetite said...

Looks SO good! I will try it!

Dana said...

I made pizza for lunch today. My daughter said it reminded her of the good old gluten days. Thanks for a great recipe!

Marsbar said...

Hello Karina, this looks really great. What flour can I use instead of the sorghum? I haven't been able to track it down in Melbourne yet. Thanks.

Anonymous said...

I can't wait to try this
Anne

Annette said...

Thank you Karina! We will be enjoying your new pizza crust Sunday evening! I can’t wait to finally have a yummy pizza again. I want you to know that we thoroughly enjoyed your Chocolate Muffin recipe – and just last night I made your Dark Chocolate Brownies with your Mexican Hot Fudge Sundae sauce. Oh my, was that a hit! I always look forward to trying your next new recipe!

Marcella said...

And this is why I love your blog so much. you have no idea how much you have helped me. I've learned so much and how to cook for my daughter. If she could talk I'm sure she was thank you as well.

I've given you an award but my little award doesn't do you justice. i think you should have your own cooking show on the Food Network! For the details though you can see my blog:
http://marcellasboys.blogspot.com/2011/02/its-major-award.html

Melomeals: Vegan for $3.33 a Day said...

Yum! That looks great! I have a really yummy and easy think GF pizza crust, but this looks like it is chewy and really great..

healingwaves1 said...

Dear Karina,
My dough is resting as we speak. A tip for rolling the dough..i put it on parchment paper and pressed parchment paper on top then rolled with a rolling pin...i did have a pizza pan to press it into.

Anxious to taste
Suzi and Deb

Jenny Eliuk @ Stay on Path said...

This looks great. Whenever I've made the pizza crust recipe by Bette Hagman, I always put a little olive oil on my hands before spreading out the dough, to keep it spreading in the pan instead of sticking to me. I'm sure that would work here too. The other night I made pizza dough and I always just use a regular, rectangular baking sheet since I abhor one-use kitchen items and have no pizza pans. When my boyfriend saw my "uniquely" shaped pizza, he thought I had made it heart-shaped on purpose. Is it wrong that I let him believe that?

Christie said...

Sounds great, trying it this next week. But, what I really want is the dinner roll recipe that inspired you to make the pizza crust!

Tylene said...

This sounds great. I can't wait to try it. I just made a pizza using polenta as the crust. It wasn't exactly pizza but I pit some rosemary in the polenta and topped it with home made sauce, good olive oil and lots of veggies and it tasted yummy.

nessabean said...

Wowza I made this tonight and it was fabulous! I've tried several different pizza crusts and haven't liked any of them particularly. Even my gluten loving 4yo ate it with gusto when moments before he was crying about having to eat gf pizza. We had an asparagus and artichoke on garlic olive oil and a salami and cheese and a roasted tomato and mushroom. I can't wait to make a chicken and artichoke pizza.

Sonja said...

Jowar is another name for Sorghum

Karina Allrich said...

Thanks, Everyone! And muchas gracias for sharing your methods of handling sticky dough.

I use the plastic wrap method for flattening crackers and cookie dough. This dough was slightly akin to batter, so I used wet hands.

I'd love to hear more about how you top your pizza...

What's your favorite pizza topping combo?

Karina xox

Jess (ATX Gluten-Free) said...

Hi Karina! Thank you for adding your link to our online gluten-free pizza party! Your pizza looks absolutely mouth-watering. Gorgeous photos, as always :) xo- Jess

Ina said...

Hi Karina! Thank you so much for this post. I have a great pizza recipe too, but I had wanted to make gluten free pizza calzones. Three times later, I finally got it by using some of your ideas. Many thanks - it turned out so so good! I will do the post tomorrow if you want to check it out.
ina@glutenfreedelightfullydelicious.com

If I were a llama said...

I made this last night for dinner! The BEST GF pizza I have been able to get a hold of! Thank You Thank You Thank You! I love pizza!

Betsy said...

I am so ready to try this! I've had some really good gluten free pizza, but the description alone makes my mouth water. Thank you for sharing!

Kasey said...

I made this tonight and it's AWESOME! I have one favorite boxed mixed (yes, believe it or not) that until tonight was the best gluten-free pizza I could make. I topped it with sauce and cheese, herbs and garlic, peppers and onions.

I was wondering though, because it looks so good and I trust your taste buds after so many successes form this blog...what kind of vegan cheese do you use? I've been trying to figure out a good substitute.

Anonymous said...

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!! XXOO This pizza is PERFECT! Made it for dinner tonight and even all the regular eaters enjoyed it. Made one pizza with red sauce, pepperoni and cheese for the regular peeps and the other I used fresh basil, tomatoes and fresh mozzarella. TO DIE FOR! Have I told you what a wonderful goddess you are, Karina? Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Karina Allrich said...

Yay- so glad you like the recipe, If I were a llama, Kasey and Anon! I can't wait to make it again. It's real pizza, isn't it? xox

As for the vegan cheese- it's by Vegan Gourmet- mozzarella style. Tip: to melt, shred it fine, drizzle with olive oil. It melts under the broiler (don't lay it on too thick), and melts beautifully in dishes like gluten-free lasagna, if you cover the dish in foil. It also melts in cheese sauces. It is soy based.

If you can't do soy, there's a vegan cheese called Daiya. It's almost as good.

Vegan cheese is an acquired taste-- but some cheeses are better than others.xox

Karina

Tina and Jeremy said...

Hi Karina,

I discovered your blog last week and I am in live with your site! We are a gluten and dairy free family, and because of that I just haven't bothered that much with baking. I'm not really into baked goods anyway, but my husband loves them. Last week I dove in with your english muffing recipe (perfection!) and this morning we had your pumpkin pancakes for breakfast. incredible.

I made this pizza crust for dinner, and sadly I was not happy with the result...something must have gone awry. There are two things I can think of...

Your english muffins and dough look like white bread whereas mine are dark because of the sorghum flour. The sorghum flour I have is quite dark, almost the colour of rye. Based on the colour of your breads, yours must be white? Are there different kinds?

I used one whole egg instead of egg whites or egg replacer (I did't want to waste good organic free range yolks!) The result was very biscuity and rick dough, not what I was expecting for pizza dough.

Any thoughts?

Thanks for the incredible recipes and the help!!

Sincerely,
Tina

Karina Allrich said...

Hi Tina, Sorghum flour (aka sweet jowar) is definitely white-cream color. I've never seen a dark sorghum flour.

Is there a chance you used teff? Teff is brown/darker like rye. I personally don't care for the taste of teff. Amaranth is another dark GF flour.

It sounds as if your dry to liquid ratio was different than mine.

It might be the difference in using my suggested 1/4 cup egg whites vs the one egg you used.

How you measure can also influence the dry to wet ratio (use dry nested volume cups for dry ingredients, and liquid measuring cup for wet).

Make sure the ingredient temps are not too hot and not too cold.

This pizza dough (as I explained in the post) is thinner than a standard dough bordering on a batter like feel. It is light and creamy. Not thick like the usual "pizza dough" you remember.

Thick dough will result in a denser product.

You mention not baking much- have you read my gluten-free baking tips posts? There's quite a bit of problem solving in those posts, too.

Glad you liked the English muffins and the pumpkin pancakes. xox

Karina

Nanci Selk said...

We made pizza for dinner tonight. It was sooo yummy!!! My 12 year old was very happy to have pizza that tastes close to what he remembers. We used homemade tomato sauce, goat mozzarella, nitrate-free pepperoni, mushrooms, green peppers, olives and Romano (sheep). Thank you for your dedication and hard work. You are appreciated.

Mars said...

Hi Karina,
I love your site, and I was super excited to try this tonight. Thanks for the recipe!

However, I must have screwed up somewhere because though the taste was good, it was way too dry and after I did the first bake it was cracking. It also didn't stick to my hands when I spread it so I was scared even from the start it was too dry..

I have had this problem before with other recipes and I can never really make good gluten free bread with any recipe,I don't know what I am doing wrong! hehe

I live in Calgary, AB..can it be altitude? Should I be adusting something for all my bread products?

When I mix the dough, if it still seems 'thick', not batter like you said it should be should I just add more water until it thins out? I didn't wait to chnage anything the first time I tried it.

I read your tips above and I had followed all of those as well:)

Any other suggestions would be great, I don't want to give up!

Thanks for the great recipes!

cheers,
Marla

Karina Allrich said...

Marla, Are you at high altitude? That does change rising/leavening issues for bread, cake, brownies, etc.

Sounds like the pizza dough was too dry.

The way we store flours, and the humidity/weather can influence flours (making them dry or dampish). Storing temperature of ingredients also influences baking and rise time (colder takes longer).

Do you store flours in freezer/refrigerator? Bring them to room temperature before using.

If you are consistently having these issues, there is, very likely, something fundamentally different that you are doing/or environmental factor is the problem, as I mentioned.

If dough or batter is dry you can add a bit more liquid to it- a spoonful at a time. And as always, if you substitute an ingredient, it will change things, and you may need to adjust dry to wet ratio.

Karina

Anonymous said...

Thank you Karina!
I made this today for my daughter. My previous attempts at pizza have been underwhelming at best, so I could tell she wasn't expecting too much as she took her first bite. I saw her eyes widen with surprise and she declared " wow - this is really good Mum!"

I did substitute quinoa flour for the millet since I find millet a bit bitter, and it was still yummy with lovely crisp outside and soft inside.

Your blog has become a favorite since my daughter and son were both diagnosed with celiac disease 6 months ago. Thank you for your generous spirit and inspirational recipes! ..... Jo

alyce said...

Beautiful photo. Glad to have found your site.

Anna-Marie said...

Karina - I know that one can never have too much pizza but ... could one shell be frozen after the first bake? Or if I halved the ingredients and only made one ... how do you think it would fare? I just tried it with a different pizza recipe and it did not go well. I'm hoping for better luck with yours ...

Emily said...

Yum! This looks delicious...you have the best recipes!

♡Emily
www.bestofthislife.blogspot.com

Cara said...

This looks so delicious! Pizza crust (not from a pre-made mix) has been my holy grail all this time. I bought a frozen crust from Jules Thin Crust in Pennsylvania recently, which was delicious, but I didn't have quite the degree of satisfaction as homemade. Can't wait to try this!

Amelia said...

Hi Karina,

This looks amazing! I know you've said you're hesitant to recommend subs but the only thing standing between me and a delicious pizza is yeast. Could you pretty please recommend something that I could replace the yeast with?

Thanks,
Amelia

His Special Kids' Families said...

It looks delicious! I wanted to know, though, have you ever tried to make a crust with almond meal? The sugars in rice really give my special needs son problems...just curious...

Karina Allrich said...

Thank you so much, everyone! xox

@Amelia- Yeast adds flavor more than anything, and maybe adds to the texture. Leave it out, if you cannot do yeast.

@His Special Kid's Families- Do you mean entirely almond flour? if so, that would be an entirely different crust. Pretty dense. A little nut flour could work, in a mix/blend of other flours.

Karina

dreaminitvegan said...

Karina I can't wait to try this recipe and your pizza looks so pretty. FYI-I've been making your bread recipe weekly and we love it!

Allison said...

I made this dough tonight! I subbed in equivalent in flax eggs for real eggs (can't eat 'em). So so so good, the crust was absolutely PERFECT. A non-gf/non-egg free/dairy free friend was over for dinner, and she even liked it! Have you tried making thin crust with this recipe? We were going to give it a try without the yeast and see what it does.

But the texture, ahhh it was perfect! I added a whole bunch of dried garlic, dried pesto mix and some random basil/nettle/tomato salt I had kicking around in the cupboard, and it was delish!!
But so so so good! Thaaaaaank you!

abstractist said...

Made this lovely recipe witht he following substitutions:
1/2 Cup coconut flour (no millet in the house)
Additional 1/4 cup olive oil for thirsty coconut flour
2 tablespoons flax meal +6 tablespoons water instead of eggs
Great texture! Even my NGF boyfriend agreed he would eat again. Six-year-old GF daughter exclaimed that I am the best cook ever. Thanks for the assist! c. ;)

Cat Ransom said...

Made this last Saturday and it was a hit. I made the following sustitutions:
1/2 cup coconut flour (no millet in the house)
additional 1/4 olive oil for thirsty coconut flour
2 tablespoons flax meal+6 tablespoons water instead of eggs.
Texture and taste satisfied NGF boyfriend who said he would eat it again. Six-year-old GF daughter exclaimed that I am the best cook ever. Thanks for the assist! c. ;)

Kristin Overton said...

Karina, you have outdone yourself once again! This is our new pizza crust! I've never been a huge fan of thin crust, which our existing gf crust has been so this was a welcome addition to the rotation in our house.

Michelle K. said...

I'm also interested in your thoughts on cutting this recipe in half.

I made this tonight and the dough ended up being very dry for me, but I just added water until it reached the consistency you described. Everything turned out perfectly.

My only mistake was that I used my pizza stone instead of pizza pans and ended up making my crust too thick. It tasted great, but it kind of overpowered the sauce and the cheese.

I'm just happy to know that I can have good pizza again! It's what I've missed the most since being diagnosed with all my food allergies. Thank you so much!

Anonymous said...

I'm new to gluten free baking,I have one question about the recipe. In the recipe it says"2 cups tapioca flour/starch" Does that mean I can use tapioca flour or tapioca starch?

Karina Allrich said...

Thank you for sharing your thoughts and variations on this recipe, Everyone. You rock. xox

As for the tapioca starch and flour- some companies package it as "flour", some as "starch", but in tapioca's case, both starch and flour are basically the same.

In the potato starch/potato flour world, however, all things are not equal. Potato flour is NOT for baking; it is too heavy and sticky.

Use potato starch in gluten-free baking.

Confusing? Yes.

Who makes these rules? ;-)

Karina xox

Tasty Eats At Home said...

Karina, this looks so good. I've too tried various pizza crusts - some are okay, and some suck. Unfortunately, the best use bean flours, and I can't deal with them either. This looks very promising! Going to have to try.

Lynn said...

I tried this tonight with high hopes. Unfortunately, it didn't work out for me. Gum city. I have a thermometer in my oven so I know it was the right temperature, my ingredients are fresh, room temperature, and I made no substitutions. What did I do wrong?!! :-(

Karina Allrich said...

Hi Tasty Eats- I'm not a fan of bean flours- taste wise or tummy wise. This flour combo is much better. xox

Lynn- This is the least gummy (as in no gumminess) pizza crust I've ever made, so I have no idea. What kind of pan did you use? Too much liquid? Humid/damp flours? You didn't use potato "flour" by any chance, did you (rather than starch)? Can't think of anything else off hand...

Karina

Lynn said...

I know, your description of its texture is why I made it! I used the exact pans that you linked to on Amazon, and I used the exact ingredients that you listed (EnerG egg replacer). I measured the liquids carefully, and it's not humid here in Michigan right now. Are too much liquid and humid/damp flours the usual suspects when it comes to gumminess? I dunno, I'm stumped.

Karina Allrich said...

Hi Lynn- Hmmm. The one difference is the egg replacer (I used real eggs). I think maybe a vegan crust may have to bake longer. Perhaps, also, next time, you might try using less liquid as you mix the dough using egg replacer. Did you use warm water?

In my own kitchen I've never seen a big difference between using eggs and Ener-G egg replacer in my recipes- both work; but apparently, there might be an issue for you.

Damp flours can be a problem, if too much liquid is added. Even a tablespoon or two can affect the outcome. Frustrating!

Karina

DesertHen said...

Hello Karina, I just wanted to tell you what an amazing recipe this is! I printed it off many weeks ago, but just got around to making it yesterday (Sunday). Oh my! What a perfect, beautiful crust! I was thrilled with the results! My family enjoyed it as well (they are not gf, but happily eat whatever I fix for them that is gf)My taste buds did a little happy dance every time I took a bite of pizza. This is the first outstanding pizza that I have had in almost a year! Thank you, thank you...you are truely a Gluten Free Goddess in my book! =)

PS..I'm eating pizza for lunch today too! =D

Lynn said...

Thanks, Karina! I always use warm water w/the egg replacer, and usually it works like a charm. The only thing I noticed was that the pizza dough seemed thicker than what you said it should be--closer to bread dough than batter. I'll give it another shot and post my results soon. I usually have excellent results with all of your recipes--you are my go-to GF Goddess, for sure. Don't know what I'd have done post-diagnosis if a friend of mine hadn't sent me to your blog. I made your coconut cake a couple of days before I made this pizza, btw, and it was *perfection.* xoxo

Becky said...

Hi Karina,
I am new to gluten-free baking, and I absolutely love your site!! I tried this pizza crust tonight, and it came out beautifully and was so tasty. I also love your pumpkin waffles, and am anxious to try your bread recipe. Thanks for sharing!

Jennifer and Jaclyn @ sketch-free vegan said...

I just started this healthy food photo sharing site: http://healthfreakfood.com/

I would love it if you submitted your pretty food photos!

Lynn said...

Hi Karina, I just wanted to let you know that I tried this recipe again tonight, and IT WORKED!!! First pizza in over 2 years. Ahhhhhhhhh ...

I added more water and less oil and baked it for about 16 minutes. It was crisp on the outside, but still chewy on the inside. Poifect.

Thank you again, Goddess. Thank you thank you THANK YOU. xoxoxo

Theresa P. said...

Hi Karina, i was just wondering is it really necessary to use that much baking powder and yeast also. wouldn't you be able to taste the baking powder? Thanks

Karina Allrich said...

Theresa, This recipe makes two big pizzas. So in essence, it's a double recipe. Karina

Rabah said...

Hi, Karina,
I don't doubt this recipe is absolute perfection- which is why I shall follow it to the t before any subsequent experimentation (as I do with all of your recipes!).
However, I can tell you that a pizza crust can never be too thin for me. I like it PAPER thin. And so does my non-celiac other half (whose naturally advantaged, gluten-riddled attempts haven't even cut it for him). Which is another reason I have doubted there could EVER be born a perfect (thin) gluten free pizza crust.....
However, I shall try. I suspect I will therefore make batch #2 without proofing the yeast, skipping out on the 15 min rise, and perhaps stabbing some air holes with a fork after spreading the dough. Any thoughts? Do I dare mess with years of goddess experimentation? ;-)

Nicole said...

This is a great crust! I subbed Ener-G's egg replacer as we can't have eggs and they turned out beautifully.

Holly said...

The BEST pizza crust EVER! My family is begging me to make this every night! :) You have completely turned our Gluten Free world into something YUMMY! We have all been feeling deprived...but not anymore! THANK YOU SO MUCH! xoxoxo

JoLynn-dreaminitvegan said...

Karina I must say you are fabulous!!!
I made this crust for my son's pizza and it was delicious! We were so pleasantly surprised with the results. It was crunchy on the outside and just enough chew to it on the inside. Perfect...just perfect!

Heidi said...

We made your pizza crust tonight and it was so yummy. For some reason when I added the wet ingredients it turned out way thick, like regular dough. I thought this is not right as you said it should be like batter. Then I thought I measured incorrectly and added more of the flours than I should have. So I did it all over again and got the same result. I did end up adding a bit of water but no where near batter consistency. What am I doing wrong? So yummy though.

J said...

OMG! Made this crust for dinner tonight and it was incredible! Absolutely perfect! I wouldn't have believed it was dairy free, gf and egg free if I hadn't made it myself. You are truly a goddess!

ali said...

Like Jackie, I cannot have millet so I substituted teff flour. I used egg replacer with one T of water. Like Heidi's, my dough turned out more like regular dough, not like batter, which was wonderful actually. I was able to push it down a bit and then use a rolling pin to flatten on the parchment paper. It was terrific and I thank you for the chance to have a great pizza again.

I will add that if any of you live in Seattle, you can go to Razzi's on Greenwood just above 85th. They have an extensive menu with pizza to die for and you can get Daiya cheese even. Heaven.

ali

marla said...

Now this is a well researched pizza crust & it sounds amazing. Love all the veggies as toppings.

David said...

My wife said, "This is the first time I've had pizza in 10 years where I haven't felt as if I'm missing out." Thank you so much for the recipe!!!

Belladune said...

I love you. This was delicious. Hubby thought it was a little different (considering we've just recently switched) But I thought it was delicious, with a very warm flavour. I don't think I'll feel so bad about being gluten free anymore. Thanks so much for the recipe!

Anonymous said...

Have been gluten free for almost 4 years and have been searching for the perfect gluten free pizza crust. I have tried tons and never found one I loved until now!!! Used your crust in my large cookie sheet and topped with prego spaghetti sauce, fried bacon, olives and itallian cheese blend and it turned out delicious. Thanks for ending my search for the perfect crust. All I have to say is YUM!! Smiles Barb

Dan said...

Hi - This looks great, but would it work to use white rice flour rather than brown rice flour?

Karina Allrich said...

After trying many different gluten-free flour combos for pizza crust, this is by far my favorite blend- for flavor, and texture.

White rice flour- I never use. It brings nothing to the overall taste or the texture. Karina

Peg said...

I stumbled across this recipe just one day after deciding to go gluten-free for health reasons (not celiac though), and what a find! For years, we've always had a homemade pizza for dinner every Friday night, and I was wondering what I would do to make a good crust without gluten. This recipe is amazing! Even my Italian husband loves it. I took this dough a step further the next day by using wet hands to shape globs of it into rounds and then "baking" them in a cast iron skillet with a lid. Flipped them over a couple of times and voila - English muffins that are absolutely delectable! We toast them for breakfast and use them for burgers. Awesome - thanks so much!!

Louise Carrier said...

Hi Karina, I couldn't believe it when I stumbled on your blog as its such a find! My boyfriend has Crohn's and is currently avoiding gluten but also sugar among other things in an attempt to avoid more intensive drug therapy (he's using Stevia in his tea) but absolutely loves pizza! Your base looks genuinely delicious so would love to try this but I wondered if you could please help with a sugar substitution please as I'm not an experienced baker? thank you so much for all your inspirational writing, recipes and photographs as its such a find for me and I'm certain its making a huge difference to hundreds of people :O)
Lots of love to you
Louise xx

Karina Allrich said...

Louise, Can he have honey or agave? Either will work instead- if he can eat fructose.

Sarah said...

Karina,
This recipe is another winner! I had to fight off my gluten-eating guests with a fork so they wouldn't devour all of my gluten-free pizza :) Well done!

mymezzaluna said...

We just found out that my son is allergic to gluten, egg, cow's milk and slightly to Millet too. Friday nights have been pizza and movie nights in our house too, so now with this recipe (I'll have to do some replacing of the eggs and millet) I think we can keep our pizza nights. Thanks you so much for sharing.

AngeliD said...

Hi Karina, I'm so excited to try this recipe out but my husband has a sensitivity to rice. Any tips on a substitute for the rice flour? Thanks so much.

Karina Allrich said...

For the half cup of rice flour I'd sub sorghum flour. Karina

Unknown said...

Karina,

If I make this dough..do you think I could freeze it for future use or should I bake it, then freeze it?

Karina Allrich said...

I have not frozen the dough, so I hesitate to guess. You might try par-baking the shell till firm. Then wrap and freeze. Let us know how your experiment works out. Karina

Anonymous said...

Like another commenter, my organic sorghum flour has always been quite a rich darkish brown in colour. I suspect that, like quinoa, there are two or more different colour strains to be had in the genus. I used to think light-coloured sorghum was similar to white rice in that it had been stripped of its outer coat, but this may not be the case at all. Must research this further. Another point, always remember that the minerals in 'whole' grains are mostly unabsorbed by the body owing to the high level of phytic acid they contain. This is why it's advised that vegans and gluten free folk should ferment their whole grains as much as possible. Grains that are already stripped of their minerals, such as white rice, don't require soaking/fermenting as there are few minerals left in the rice for the body to utilize. For people who eat a lot of grains I'd suggest learning how to ferment their whole grains as often as they can.

Shelley said...

Karina - thank you so much - Friday night pizza has returned to our home!
I only had to sub corn for the millet as I was unexpectedly out and used buckwheat for sorghum as it no longer settles well with many of us, but it all worked out beautifully.
*As a side note * I did soak the grains for several hours before making it and it worked out so nice, we have learned through much trial and error that soaked grains are so much kinder to GF/celiac tummies.
Please keep up the good work.

Nicole said...

BEST DINNER EVER!!!! thank you thank you karina :). when my mum was making this, we were both really worried...because it looked so funny and wet and sticky and thick. but it turned out like magic. it tasted a thousand times better than the 'white flour' pizzas you get from takeout. it was the best dough i have ever had and we have been making dough my whole life (i'm 18). it was fluffy and chewy yet yeasty in taste. very familiar. nothing like those rubbery pizzas from the tasteless days of GF eating.

we didn't use any brown sugar in the dough but added an extra teaspoon of oil olive, but with the yeast, we added a teaspoon of agave. and it turned out beautifully.

thank you thank you karina. my life is delicious. we have only tried your amazing basic bread and this, so i can't wait to eat moe things that taste good and make my body feel fantastic!!

Caitlin said...

my husband and i are gluten-free vegans and this is the best pizza we've had to date. thanks, karina, for being so freakin amazing. you certainly are the gluten-free goddess ;)

Dawn said...

Oh my gosh!!! Just made this pizza crust and I've found my new favorite. After trying probably 10 pizza recipes since going gluten free and being disappointed every time this one is a winner. Thank you for posting it. I love it

Heidi said...

Is it possible to refrigerate half of the dough for a day or two and make just a single pizza at a time instead of making two? I am used to making regular non-GF dough for pizza but was dx with celiacs a few weeks ago so trying to figure out what I can and can't do with the GF flours that I used to do with regular wheat flours. Thank you btw for your recipes - it has made this much more bearable and has kept me busy trying my hand at making new things instead of sulking about what I can't have. :)

Superstar said...

You're right!! It does not suck! I haven't made a trip to my local Mennonite bulk store in a while, so I was out of a few things. I can't wait to try it with all the right ingredients. Since I didn't have some things, I used what was left of my sorghum (1/2 c) and 1 1/2 c oat flour. I used potato starch instead of tapioca. It was chewy (but not overly so), didn't have the taste or texture of dirt, and even looked good! As I said, the next round will be with all the correct ingredients, but even with my substitutions, the result of this recipe was satisfying.

I'm usually yeast-free, but I'm in the first trimester of pregnancy and have to eat something, and breads don't make me sick. So I'm doing yeast for a little while at least.

Thanks for the recipe!

Karina Allrich said...

Thanks again for your enthusiasm. xox

As for making the dough ahead of time and freezing it...

I haven't tried freezing it. Maybe you could experiment- or try wrapping the dough and keeping it in the fridge for up to three days?

Other possibility is to make two pizzas and partially bake one till set. Then freeze it.

Let us know if you try any of these methods.

Cheers! xox
Karina

Rach said...

Must make pizza.

Anonymous said...

Hi Karina,
I love your recipes. Really, really love Pizza and miss it. However, I need to remain starch free. Any advice? What happens if starch is not used in pizza crust? Would it cause it to be heavy/dense? Thanks for any advice/suggestions.

Anonymous said...

the recipe sounds fabulous, I am excited to look at your substitution help list and see if I can modify this for my needs. Thanks for posting a great recipe & article

Anonymous said...

Karina, Darling Karina- Thank you.

This pizza crust was delicious- everything I have been missing in a chewy, crunchy crust. Thank you!!!

-erica

Anonymous said...

Have I told you lately that I love you? The recipe is great. Thanks.

Daniel said...

I made the pizza tonight and my son ate it. I was so happy that he did because I have been having the hardest time find the right recipe that did't taste GF. Thanks so much.

Anonymous said...

I love to try it but i am concerned with the amount of sugar..... 3tablespoons...I don't really want a sweet crust......anybody tried without the sugar?

BSmith said...

Hi karina. I had a couple of questions about this recipe. When you say to "beat the egg whites" what do you mean exactly. Can I beat them a little with a fork or do I need to bust out my mixer and beat them with actual beaters? If so, how long? Second question is about the yeast. How long do you let the yeast sit before it is ready to use. thanks so much. BTW, I just made your GF zucchini bread last night and it turned out amazing.

Karina Allrich said...

Thanks everyone! xox

Questions-

The sugar feeds the yeast and balances the flavor of the gluten-free flours. If you'd prefer less, use less.

Egg whites- hand beat with a fork.

How long to proof yeast- just until it's puffy- you'll see it happen. It takes a couple of minutes. No big whup.

xox Karina

Brad said...

The consistency of the crust is great, but it has to be one of the blandest doughs I've ever tasted. Also, I would consider turning the oven up to 450.

erica said...

This was definitely the best GF pizza I've had! I made it just like a white pizza - fantastic. The dough is almost reminiscent of a soft pretzel from one of those mall pretzel chains I used to grab a snack from back in the day! I'm thinking pretzels with this dough!

Karina Allrich said...

Erica- What a fab idea. Let me know if you try pretzels. I know a certain someone here who would be in seventh heaven if I made pretzels. xox

Dayce Schrieber said...

Made it for my son's school pizza party, and it was a big hit. Kids without allergies went straight to it instead of the take out pizza. I did have to add about 4 Tbsp of room temp water to get it to the smooth consistency you described. It looked like dough when I first mixd it, but the extra water got it to a wetter, stick dough that cooked perfectly.

Thanks for sharing this one!

Darla said...

I'm anxious to try your recipe. We've been "pizza free" for a while now. We love pizza.

If you have the pleasure of visiting San Diego's Gaslamp Qtr, check out Sammy's Woodfired Pizza. They offer a gluten free crust with vegan (Daiya) cheese. I tried it last weekend. My husband & I thought it was great. Sammy's has other CA/NV locations.

Becka said...

Thank you for this recipe Karina, My family and I moved from the USA to Ecuador two years ago and my son and I both have celiac's. There are no special boxed mixes to be found here and so I have had to learn to experiment and be willing to fail. This was the case with this recipe, except there was no failure! I tried to stay as true to texture/color/density of flours as I could with what is available here and I must say, I can not imagine that it would be better with the original. Thank you for creating such a workable recipe and instructions.

Here are the subs I used in case you happen to have other South American readers:

2 cups yuca starch
1 cup Quinoa flour
1/2 cup Plantain flour
1/2 cup haba flour (this is a type of bean flour)

Saxo Stamper said...

Thank you so much, have just come across your blog whilst searching for decent pizza and oh wow, you are so talented and so clever, going gluten free was the best thing I ever did and to have good pizza would be the icing on the cake.

Karen x

Melissa said...

This was AMAZING!!! We loved the pizza crust. I sliced mine in half to make a thin crust since that is my preference. The best part (for us) is that at lunch today I made it again and sliced it all width-wise (make sense?. For one boy I put the bread sized squares in the toaster for pb & j. He LOVED it. It tasted just like whole wheat toast. For the other I put vegan margarine on small cracker sized squares and broiled them until crispy. He ate his with pate. I ate a bit of both and was simply blown away at the taste and versatility of the recipe. The hamsters in my brain are running their wheel like mad as I can think of 101 uses for the tasty gem of a recipe. I can't possibly thank you enough! :)

Sarah said...

Absolute success! My 5 year old said it was better than Pizza Hut!! Thank you! I am so glad I found your blog.

Unknown said...

Thank you, thank you, thank you.

I tried your recipe tonight and it was by far the best gluten-free pizza crust I've had.

I didn't have the millet flour so I used oat flour instead, but it was still fantastic. It had a pleasant flavor, a texture similar to one made with wheat, and just-right firmness.

Pizza night has been disappointing since I've been gluten-free, especially since I usually have a biscuit-like gluten-free crust while I make my wife Jeffrey Steingarten's fantastic recipe. Oh the jealousy! But with this crust Dear Lady, I'm human again! I have been reborn unto the world of delicious pizza pies.

I'll push this recipe around the gluten-free community here in Vancouver, BC, and before long there will be talk of erecting a monument to the Goddess.

Andrea said...

I want to tell everyone how great this pizza crust recipe is. I am an Arizonan who lives less than a block from Picazzo's and I won't be going there anymore, not when I can make gluten-free pizza crust THIS good (and it's so easy!) Okay, it's not super chewy like the wheat crust we miss, but it's delicious and has a super satisfying crunch. Here's what surprised me most, I reheated the pizza the next day, placing it directly on the oven rack and it was even BETTER the second day!

CC said...

Has anyone pre-made the crusts and then baked them later? There is a "pizza making party" coming up, and wondered if crust could be made ahead of time, and then assembled and baked during the party.

bravenewlibrary said...

I just made this pizza this week!

I made one pizza for eating immediately, and then split the rest of the dough into 6 pieces to make pizza pockets (bake then freeze, and reheat for lunches later on in the week). It was AMAZING.

I used tapioca starch, brown rice flour and a half cup of oat flour for this since I didn't have sorghum or millet. It still worked wonderfully, but 1.25 cups of water to 4 cups of flour just didn't seem right to me. When I mixed the flours in, the water barely made a dent. I added another half cup and ended up with a stiff dough, almost exactly like wheat flour pizza doughs that I made before I found out that I was allergic. It still worked beautifully, but I am a bit confused about how exactly 1.25 cups of water is supposed to give us a wet, batter-like dough.

Thanks!

Clarice said...

Karina, I'm new to your site and GF....this recipe is phenomenal as written. Thank you so much! My family loves this crust. I was worried about the amount of sugar, too, but it's not "sweet" at all in our opinion. It's just perfect. I prefer this crust to any other I've made, even the glutenou kind. :) Thanks again!

Ashlee Valentine said...

I made this tonight and it will be my go to pizza from now on. Thank you so much!!
Ashlee

afwife said...

Wow I have finally found gluten free pizza bliss. To make personal size pizzas with thin crust (the way I like it) I half the recipe and divide the dough into 3 9 inch cake pans. I baked the crust in their pans on a pizza stone at 500 degree for 5 minutes then pulled them out and put on toppings. I then broiled the pizzas for 4 minutes or so and there you go. It's not delivery... it's Gluten Free and not loaded with grease! I didn't even have millet flour (I added more brown rice flour and sorghum flour instead) and it is still delicious. I even made cinammon sticks. while thin crust pizza dough is not ideal for cinnamon sticks the crust was still tasty. I may never order delivery again. Thank you! I salute your excellent culinary skills.

afwife said...

Also, the first time I made it, i added too much sugar, and it was actually a nice sweet bread base. Someone also mentioned that this recipe is reminiscent of pretzels, and I think I'll try it and let you all know how it goes. Like another review, I can think of 101 uses for this wonderfully simple recipe. Thank agains!

Shortsalmon said...

Hi Karina-- this was one of the first GFrecipes I tried when my son came up GFCF (the first recipe was your sweet potato cornbread, which we had with a canned bean soup before I knew how to read labels and avoid "modified food starch"... But I digress) and I just had to tell you that I will never forget watching dear son, who never ate because food always made him feel bad, push himself back from the table, rub his belly and let loose with a big 10 year old belch of satisfaction. A rewarding moment for a mom who knew nothing about GF cooking. A year and a half later, you are still our go-to recipe blog! Thanks so much for sharing your talents--all of them.

Teressa Gappmayer said...

Stumbled across this on Pintrest. Looks really good. One question though, does it freeze well? It would be nice to make some to have on hand when I don't want to cook. .....granted, that would be most of the time!
Thanks,
Teressa

neverett said...

Oh Karina:
I can't wait to make this pizza dough. We've been jonesin' for a good pie!! My 6 year old, Everett, is my baking buddy. I'm the only GF one in the house but my three years' experiments get eaten along with my successes. Just today Ev was saying we should make your foccacia again...and kudos on listening to Crowded House! They've always been on my list of top bands!!
-Ellen G.

Anonymous said...

I have a sensitivity to yeast as well as gluten. Any ideas for making pizza crust without yeast.

Michelle F. said...

This looks amazing! I'm a big pizza lover and have only found one place that has decent GF pizza and they are individual servings, not big pies for the whole family. Thank you for sharing this.

Cookiecraver said...

I didn't have millet, so substituted 1/2 cup of garbanzo and fava bean flour. This bread is delicious all by itself. I cut about 8 wedges from the whole flatbread and freeze them in a bag. When I want bread I take one out and pop it in the toaster. Now that I have millet, I'm eager to try out the pizza crust! I used corn flour to dust the greased pan. The hardest thing about this recipe is flattening it out on the pan. This time, I put some canola oil on my hands, and although it still stuck when the oil ran out, it gave me the idea of using a water and oil mix. If you keep wetting your hands the second they start to stick, you can work more quickly flattening it out on the pan. Even if you have a bit of the mix on your hands, you can still dunk them in the water/oil mix and keep working. The oil helps to brown the bread a bit on top. I only bake it for 13 minutes total.

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