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Gluten-Free English Muffins Recipe

Lovely gluten free English muffins with nooks and crannies
Lovely, toasty gluten-free English muffins. I kid you not.

Tea Worthy English Muffins


After four attempts we have a gluten-free English muffin we can toast with pride. An English muffin worthy of jam. Worthy of peanut butter. Or a sit down breakfast. Heck, worthy of breakfast in bed. These warm and golden little babies are too crispy-tender good to munch running to the bus stop or strapped in your car, thinking about the onslaught of your daily tasks. These muffins deserve a proper plate. A mug of tea. Your Sunday morning iTunes playlist.

I'm not sure why a simple English muffin is so tricky to recreate gluten-free (and in my case, also vegan- no milk and eggs to help the stubborn gluten-free flours fluff and rise). I thought it would be a snap. So I perused Alton Brown's recipes for inspiration, found his English muffin recipe, and did a quick gluten-free casein-free conversion. It seemed doable. Although I knew from experience that using a griddle to cook gluten-free muffins would be trouble.

I opted for baking the muffins on a sheet lined with my trusty Exopat (using a liner keeps those overly sensitive gluten-free flours from scorching on the bottom). I'm using English muffin rings to help shape the dough (I purchased them at Amazon). A reader suggested on Twitter I could use cleaned out tuna cans, but. That seems a tad unappetizing (intellectually, I know tuna cans would work; emotionally, all I keep visualizing is the mystery neighbor in Neil Simon's Barefoot in the Park who piles his smelly used tuna cans out in the hallway).

Using Alton's basic template the first batch turned out very dense, with no rise and no crunchy edges- though the dough looked promising (pictured above, rising). Dense was not a quality I wanted in my muffin. So I tried again, this time using my own original Gluten-Free Bread recipe as a template (I'm loving the combo of sorghum, potato starch and millet as a flour base for yeasted breads these days). The result was better- but still not quite there.

After a third attempt I realised that the issue might be moisture. I was creating a dough that resembled wheat dough, and I could shape it a bit and pat it into the English muffin rings, but the result was heavy and more resembled a gluten-free hockey puck.

The fourth try was the charm (sometimes perseverance pays off). I added more warm water to the dough (than seemed wise), until it was more of a thick cake batter than a stretchy playful dough.

And sweet bi-locating John from Cincinnatti! It worked.



Gluten free English muffins recipe
Toasted gluten-free English muffins, Baby.

Karina's Gluten-Free English Muffin Recipe

Recipe originally posted April 2009 by Karina Allrich.

Those of you using dairy and eggs, this GFCF recipe would translate into a more traditional recipe using milk and organic free-range eggs. You might start with one beaten egg, and slightly less milk to start out- especially if you like a dense and chewy English muffin (eggs will make them lighter and fluffier). The dough is akin to a thick, sticky cake batter.

First:

Turn your oven on for minute to warm it, then turn it off. Grease 8 English muffin rings and place them on a lined baking sheet. Sprinkle a little cornmeal inside the rings if you like.

Ingredients:

1 cup sorghum flour (aka jowar flour)
1 cup potato starch (not potato flour) or tapioca starch
1/2 cup organic millet flour
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 1/4 teaspoons fine sea salt
1 cup water at 110 to 115ºF.
1/2 cup plain hemp or soy or almond milk at 110 to 115ºF.
1 pinch of raw sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons dry active yeast 
4 tablespoons light olive oil
2 tablespoons honey or raw organic agave nectar
2 large organic free-range eggs or Egg Replacer (1/4 cup liquid)

Instructions:

Whisk together the flours, xanthan gum and sea salt.

Mix the warm water and milk; add the sugar and the yeast; stir. Set aside until the yeast begins to get poofy.

Add the proofed yeast to the dry ingredients. Add the oil, honey and egg.

Mix thoroughly. It should be more like a thick muffin batter than a bread dough. A wee bit sticky. If you need to thin a little, add a tablespoon of warm water and mix.

Allow the dough to rest for a few minutes.

Note: You can also create this dough in your bread machine. Use the mix/dough cycle. Let it rest a bit in the machine; then spoon it into the muffin rings for rising.
Spoon the dough into the eight English muffin rings. Using wet fingers press and smooth out the tops of the dough.


English muffin rings and dough, rising.


Next:

Place the baking sheet into the warm oven and allow the dough to rise. Check after 15 minutes. The dough needs to double in height.

Bake in the center of a 350ºF oven for about 20 to 25 minutes, until firm and slightly golden (gluten-free dough doesn't brown very much; go by touch to see if they're done).

Remove and cool on a wire rack.

Fork split in half, and toast for maximum crispy edged tender goodness.

Makes 8 English muffins.

Tip:

Wrap leftover muffins in foil, bag, and freeze for the freshest muffin experience.


 photo Print-Recipe.png




Recipe Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you. 


Gluten-free English muffins with jam. Delicious.



xox Karina

118 comments:

  1. These look amazing. Every once in a while, I really miss English muffins. I will have to give them a go.

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  2. They look fabulous.

    Is that millet or millet flour?

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  3. Yum! I'm trying this one for sure. Thanks!! Now do I buy the english muffin rings or try the tuna cans? :)

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  4. What could I sub for millet?

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  5. FIRST!! wow, i feel special!! Oh my those look AMAZING Karina! You've done it once again!! Not that I'm surprised in the least! Everything you make is wonderful!! I can't wait to try these!! ;-)Cheers dear girl!!

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  6. Oh my God. I have been CRAVING English muffins SO BADLY!! I've tried making some but they resemble hamburger buns more than they do muffins (which isn't a bad thing per se but still, I want English muffins). I'm making these as soon as I can! Thank you so much for this recipe!!

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  7. ohhhh my goodness, you goddess!! english muffins are something that I've missed so much since being gluten-free. I just finished lunch, but my stomach is growling at the sight of these - definitely going at the top of my to-make list. thank you so much!!

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  8. Those look wonderful! :)

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  9. Oh, I could kiss you right now! ;) I was on attempt #7 and utterly stumped. Thanks so much for saving me yet another English Muffin Meltdown -- you're the best!

    P.S. I see lots of questions about millet flour -- we get ours at the asian market for ultra-cheap. I typically find it hiding in the Indian foods section under the name "bajri flour".

    ~Michelle @ In the Life of a Child

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  10. Oh. my. goodness. I'm over the moon that you've managed to make gf English muffins that look like the right thing! I'm all over this recipe.

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  11. Mmm, those look really yummy =D!!

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  12. Oh they do look great and crunchy :O

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  13. These look great! I will be trying these soon, probably subbing out some potato starch and making them more healthy. Thanks for another great recipe, Karina!

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  14. Oh bless you! These look wonderful and perfect for our allergens.
    And I too thought of Barefoot in the Park at the mention of the tuna cans ;)

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  15. Wow, this is amazing! I'm so excited to make these! Much more cost effective (and undoubtedly tastier) than the average GF freezer section muffins. Now, to find a way to eat enough tuna that I can get me some cans...

    Thanks so much for undertaking this recipe! Another winner, for sure!

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  16. Wow, Karina, I am impressed. . I may have to invest in some of these English muffin rings. . .I've got a question. In your bread recipes, you say egg replacer for 2 eggs then 1/4 with warm water in the parenthesis. Do you mean 1/4 cup of the actual dry ener-g egg replacer, or are we talking about a total of 1/4 cup of mixture of egg replacer and water? I think of egg replacer for two eggs as 1 tbs of the replacer plus 2 tbs of water. . .so I may not be understanding your amounts correctly.

    Thanks,

    moonwatcher

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    Replies
    1. Yes- 1/4 cup egg replacer mixed is the powder mixed with water.

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  17. Gorgeous. You are brilliant at adapting these recipes, no doubt about it!

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  18. Yumm ! I have to make this... Although I haven't found sorghum flour, nor millet flour over here :-s

    I loved to eat English Muffins with jam, or with honey. Mmm !

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  19. Double wow! Those look so amazing, that I can't wait to try them. I bought some really horrible ones that I had to throw out, and I have a feeling that these won't be going anywhere, but into my stomach! I like my muffins with a bit of buttery spread and jelly. I also like them as a quick lunch with a slice of soy cheese, and have been known to use them for mini pizzas.

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  20. Hi Honey, I have a question, when making muffins can I not just used a All Purpose G.F Flour mix? They never seem to come out right. What do I need to do?
    Thanks honey, bye,,,,,,,,,,,Helemarie

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  21. Hi Karina,

    I have been reading your blog for a while now but have yet to introduce myself. I was diagnosed with celiac freshman year of college, which made my experience pretty interesting (dorm food and dining out was difficult and made it hard to socialize, avoiding beer/parties, etc). I am now a senior, and despite giving up so much, I am eating healthier, enjoying cooking, and am no longer fearful of going out :)

    One of the recipes I miss most is cinnamon bread (my favorite was the Sun-Maid raisin bread). I tried Bob Mill's cinnamon raisin bread mix, but it turned out all crumbly and very dry. I am wondering if you have a recipe or know of a recipe or great mix for cinnamon raisin bread (or rolls or muffins).

    Anyway, your blog is beautiful! I feel lucky to have found it!
    Thank you for all these recipes!

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    Replies
    1. I might try to create a cinnamon swirl bread... Thank you for your kind words!

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  22. Wow those look delicious! And I actually have all the ingredients on hand - cant wait to make this recipe! Now what to use for the rings? Thanks for sharing!

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  23. Ummmm assurance that to my girl him(her)
    Thank you very much

    Sonia sin gluten

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  24. fantastic! english muffins and other bread things have never been on my "to-make" list. but it does seem like it would be fun. and then you'd be able to say "i know how to make those!"

    anyway thanks for the recipe :)

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  25. I love using English muffin rings for hamburger buns... now I'll get to use them for their intended purpose!
    My husband is going to love these as much as the mounds of butter he will put on them!

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  26. horray for the fabulous gluten free muffins!

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  27. Love them! I made them last night for my 3 year old son and 5 year old daughter. They had them for dessert with butter and strawberry jam. SO YUMMY and comforting. The next time I make them I may kick up the amount of millet to 3/4 cup and decrease the potato starch to 3/4 c. Wondering if that would make them a tad chewier and a little less tender? Thank you so much for your dedication to good food. Your ideas always inspire.

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    1. Yay. I'm always up for more whole grain, less starch. Even it makes it a tad chewier, or more dense- I enjoy that, over starchy... don't you?

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  28. I am definitely going to make these! My non-GF, but dairy, egg and soy intolerant husband will be thrilled!

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  29. Absolutely beautiful! Good work!!

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  30. When I saw this, I just had to try these. I had attempted converting another recipe for English muffins before, but without much luck. They had a decent taste, but rather resembled hockey pucks. With this recipe, I used my own flour combo that I've been able to tolerate (sorghum and millet are not ones that I can handle) - brown rice, tapioca, potato and ground flax seed. I used real eggs and didn't need to alter my liquids since with the flax seed, I would have needed extra liquid anyway. They were absolutely yummy! Next attempt will be to go back to the pita recipe I've been toying with - I think the trick is I need more liquid for a similar type of "sticky batter" consistency than I was used to with non-GF bread. Thanks so much for posting this recipe, Karina!

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  31. Wow, those look yummy!

    And you could use tuna cans if you don't mind a little Bisphenol-A from the can liner. Stick with your muffin rings.

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  32. Hi, Karina! I made your English muffins this morning.

    So... I'm the person who watched TV on Thursday night, forming foil into rings. For a trial run to see if it was worth the investment in the muffin rings. Answer: Yes. I'll be ordering them soon.

    Now for a question: what about a loaf of bread? The flavor is so good! Guess I'll get my answer soon. I have a loaf pan with this recipe rising in the oven right now.

    I usually use a smaller loaf pan for GF baking. I just can't get used to short pieces of bread. I'd rather have a smaller piece of more evenly-proportioned bread. But I put this one in the regular sized pan. I'm hoping the weight of the dough won't keep it from rising.

    I'll let everyone know how it turns out.

    Oh! And my son (who's eating a fried-egg sandwich on an English muffin right now) wanted me to add: I love them so so (near indefinite) good.

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  33. This recipe worked great as a loaf of bread!

    I cut many GF loaves into thick slices because thinner slices crumble. But this recipe made WONDERFUL thin slices.

    I definitely will make the bread in my smaller loaf pan next time, so it will be more of a square shape (instead of a short rectangle).

    I put the dough into a greased loaf pan and placed it in the warmed oven and let it rise for 45 minutes. Then I baked the bread for about 45 minutes in a 350 oven.

    This is a great recipe! Thank you so much!

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    1. Awesome! I will try it as a loaf, too. Thanks for stopping back to let us know. xox

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  34. Thank you, everyone, for the enthusiastic support. These are so good- we've made them twice already.

    Questions:

    Millet flour, yes; I fixed the recipe. Thanks. ;-)

    Millet flour is a lovely nutty tasting flour that is not gritty. If you need to replace it, I might suggest a light buckwheat flour; or in a pinch, brown rice or teff flour; though these changes will impact the flavor.

    As for subbing the starch: The potato starch gives these muffins lightness, with golden crunchy edges, and it keeps the English muffins from getting too crumbly, so I wouldn't rush to substitute all the potato starch; using a denser high protein flour will give you a denser, drier, heavier end result.

    And for the millet to starch ratio- if you want to try using a little more millet, and a little less starch, you will get a heavier English muffin. But if you like the texture density of "whole grains" you might like it.

    And Mari, thank you for stopping back to share your English Muffin Bread version of this recipe. I'll have to try it, too. Thanks for sharing your method.

    As always- you rock, Folks. xox

    Karina

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  35. awesome recipe. I adore english muffins. Thank you for sharing the process you went through to make them as well as the recipe. It shows how much effort you went into to make them taste and feel like their gluten counter parts.

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  36. Thank you so much! I made these tonight (ate late because of it, but well worth the wait). They turned out gorgeous, and SO tasty! I'm going to have one slathered with butter and homemade raspberry jam in the morning, and smile because they're all MINE... and I'm not sharing!

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  37. they look fantastic! can't wait to test out the recipe!

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  38. hey! nooks & crannies!!! you are great! they taste wonderful too. I do have a question though. mine are a tad moist on the inside. I have found that when I use agave, I get this result or perhaps my dough was a little wetter than you described above. So, what do you think I should try to alter this???

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  39. Hi Bill- If you find that happening with agave, then I'd just leave it out. Or you could use a little less liquid. Do you use dry nested cups to measure flours? And a liquid measuirng cup for wet? That makes a slight difference, too. Your oven might also be a tad lower in temperature; you could also try baking for a bit longer (I'd lower temp to 325 for this).

    Good luck- hope that helps.

    Karina

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  40. Hi Karina - just wanted to drop by and say THANKS for this recipe. I've made it three times now (and I expect to make it regularly!!) and am thoroughly enjoying the light, fluffy, delicious muffins for breakfast most days.

    I also wanted to note that I've tried this with both rice milk and hemp milk, and the hemp milk seems to work a bit better. The hemp versions I made were lighter, rose higher and had better nooks and crannies inside when I cut them open. (This is not to say the rice milk versions were bad - they were just not as good. :)

    This was also much my first attempt at GF baking and I'm so encouraged. Yay! I am wheat, dairy and egg free myself, so I am LOVING your site. THANKS!

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  41. One question - can I hand mix these or should I use my Kitchen Aid? What are all of the rest of you doing?

    I can't wait to make these!

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  42. If I had a Kitchen Aid mixer, I would use it. Right now I just mix by hand.

    Karina

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  43. Zee- Thanks for stopping back to let me know. I really appreciate it. Glad you liked the muffins. I need to make some soon.

    Karina

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  44. Christy19:28

    Karina,

    I am anxious to make the English muffins. My son loves cinnamon/raisin muffins. Do you know how much I should add to the recipe? Also, if I wanted to use eggs/dairy, what would I need to do to convert the recipe?

    Thanks,
    Christy

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  45. Christy- I'd start with 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, and perhaps 1/3 to 1/2 cup raisins- depending upon how many you like in each muffin. Start with less and add more as you mix.

    Good luck- and let us know how they turn out.

    Karina

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  46. Guest13:00

    I think I someone already asked but can regular milk and 2 eggs be used instead of the substitutes or does the recipe or amounts need to be altered?

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  47. Karina15:39

    I would think this recipe would be delicious with real eggs and milk. With gluten-free bread recipes eggs really help. Beat them till frothy before adding.

    Recent blog:=- Coconut Carrot Cake

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  48. Karina14:15

    I don't see why not. Real eggs usually improve a gluten-free recipe. And dairy can be used in place of non-dairy in any of my recipes.

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  49. Anonymous18:27

    I think I someone already asked but can regular milk and 2 eggs be used instead of the substitutes or does the recipe or amounts need to be altered?

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    1. Yes- in general-- I've found that real dairy vs non-dairy is pretty interchangable. And in recipes calling for 1/4 mixed vegan egg replacer- that's two eggs, beaten. Also- works both ways, I find.

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  50. Real eggs and milk would work fine, I imagine. Gluten-free baking benefits from using real eggs, especially.

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  51. Annhayes2002@yahoo.ca18:12

    Hello Karina,
    Lovely to find you today, and I've been busy printing off some of your delicious-sounding recipes, including English Muffins which I love ad miss desperately, since they contain soy up here in Canada, and I am allergic to soy. Glad to hear of a good replacement for millet, which is a goitrogen and not good for people with thyroid disease also. Gonna make some of your recipes presto pronto because you are making me so hungry.

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  52. Karina,

    I just made these. I've only had the little crusty bits that have fallen off the rings, but I'm ecstatic. I'm actually don't have sensitivities to gluten or dairy (a little to cow dairy products) but made these to "save" Christmas breakfast for my boyfriend's brother...I mean, eggs benedict without English muffins? Terrifying.
    I followed your recipe to the T, except using 2 happy organic eggs and almond milk (that's just what I had on hand). They were in the oven for about 35 minutes (I also live in LA), and since I don't have a silpat, I used Parchment paper. The bottoms actually browned nicely.

    I have a question, are the tops of your muffins poofy? Your photos only showed the middle, and I can't imagine how the top could have stayed flat through rising.

    Anyway, taste test later with Almond Butter (I feel bad saying it since you can't have it, but that's the only spread I have) and tomorrow boyfriend and his family get to enjoy. Thanks so much.

    Ana

    ps Your multi-grain gluten free sandwich bread is in my Cuisinart as I type. Yum.

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  53. I just had one toasted, then added Almond Butter. OH MY GOODNESS. So delcious. No one else is getting any. :P

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  54. Anonymous19:41

    Hi Karina,

    My naturopath has put me on a gluten & dairy free detox, but I can't have potato, and here in Australia Tapioca starch isn't easy to find, I could maybe find tapioca flour. Any suggestions on what I could use instead? The lady in the health food store said arrowroot (just called arrowroot, not arrowroot flour or arrowroot starch) may help but wasn't sure.

    Katherine in Oz

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  55. Ana- I baked these at high altitude, so the rise would be less than at sea level. My muffins were gently rounded.

    Katherine- For any of the starches in my recipes you could substitute arrowroot starch/flour- though I find the taste of arrowroot bitter in larger quantities.

    I also think what you call tapioca flour is akin to our tapioca starch. If your tapioca flour is fine and soft, use that; it would be the best choice for flavor and tenderness.

    You could also use cornstarch (do you call fine corn flour starch or flour?).

    Cheers!

    Karina

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  56. I had bookmarked this recipe a few weeks ago and pulled it out to try because my son's 2nd grade class was making "pizzas" with English muffins. I'm happy to report that these are WONDERFUL! Thank you for sharing and for your beautiful blog... I love reading your posts! Now, any ideas for a good hot dog or hamburger bun? (I made some for a campout the other day and they could have been used as a lethal weapon!)

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  57. These look absolutely divine. I've tried English Muffins by two published authors and the flavor and texture were not something I'd like to repeat. However, since I am now the proud owner of a "muffin top/hamburger pan" do you think I could use that rather than the circles? If necessary I could probably build up the sides with parchment paper rounds. By the way, you're marvelous for sharing.

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  58. Virginia- I think my Delicious Gluten-Free Bread recipe with sorghum would make a fab gluten-free roll or bun. Will work on it.

    Laurelvb- I don't have a muffin top pan so I'm not able to say for sure if they are deep enough for baking English muffins. But, I'm thinking, Why not? The muffins will be thinner. So keep an eye on them; they may bake faster. Stop back and let us know.

    Karina

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  59. English muffins are one of my major comfort foods. I baked these yesterday and they are great!

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  60. Anonymous17:33

    I used the ring part of the lid of a Ball jar to form the muffins. The ring was about 3 1/2" across. Grease/spray, put them on a non stick cookie sheet, fill with batter...they taste terrific.

    Don't use the flat insert as it has a rubber ring.

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  61. I made these tonight and they are great. But mine rose really high and looked more like hamburger buns. They are really soft,I used rapid rise yeast, real eggs, cow's milk and canola oil.. Do you know what would cause me to have more fluffy rolls? They are great but not english muffin type. I made 9 huge muffins.. ha! any tips?

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  62. Laura, Real eggs and milk will produce a fluffier, higher muffin than my vegan version, for sure. Perhaps you could use less dough in each ring- make 11 or 12 instead of 9?

    Karina

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  63. Thank you.. I will for sure try these again,, the fluffy texture was not a bad thing but for next time I made try to do less dough in each ring! Its rare to have baked goods rise too much! ha.. These made a nice egg muffin sandwich for lunch today!

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  64. I am a Foodie and quite depressed as I was just diagnosed with Celiacs. And I'm only 31!!! This blog is amazing and will certainly help lift my spirits. In fact, the pumpkin corn muffins already helped, as they were incredible and didn't seem strange at all! Just super yummy!! Here is my challenge to you, Dear Karina: can you create a recipe (very similar to the above recipe perhaps?) for my all-time-favorite gluten-filled food:

    Extra Sourdough English Muffins (TJ's sells a fab gluten version, and this was my breakfast *every* morning until last week.)

    I would be forever grateful. ~Erin

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  65. Made them today! I ate the first one right out of the oven, could not wait! Soooo good! It smells and taste "real"! will have some toasted tomorrow for breakfast...
    Oh, and I had the same emotional blockage with tuna cans. One of my big sisters gave me English muffin rings and a silicon mat for xmas. Finally tried them out today.
    Sonia, Dieppe, New Brunswick Canada

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  66. I tried the English muffin recipe this morning. It was fabulous. I don't normally like millet because it imparts a corn taste but it worked here. I used whole milk, egg replacer, 2T of agave and 5oz of water rather than 8oz and substituted coconut oil for the olive oil. I baked them for 20 minutes, removed the rings and flipped them over for another 5 minutes so both sides were browned. I was impressed with how they didn't fall, soft and fluffy, not crumbly on the inside and toasted up like a dream. I split them with a fork before toasting. I only had 4 muffin rings so I baked the rest of the dough using small cake rings. They are a little larger and thicker and I'm looking forward to trying them as hamburger buns. I'll also try this recipe in my hot dog bun pan. I've been looking for a recipe that would work for that, and I think this may be the one.

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  67. The egg replacer I found has wheat gluten in it. Do they make one without it?

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  68. Great stuff everyone- thanks!

    As for the egg replacer- I use a gluten-free one- of course! I've been gluten-free since 2001.

    If you check the recipe above, hover over the egg replacer ingredient- it shows you what I use- and buy- from Amazon- Ener-G Egg Replacer.

    Cheers!

    Karina

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  69. Another awesome recipe, Karina! We always preferred English muffins as hamburger buns even before going GF. I bought baking rings and made buns from a store-bought GF bread mix once, but these are so much better and only slightly more effort. Now I'm thinking breakfast sandwiches and mini-pizzas. Thanks again.

    Also, thanks for offering recipes that use millet flour (which I love) and that don't require tapioca flour (which I really, really don't love).

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  70. These are really good although I think the texture of mine were maybe more a cross between a fluffy biscuit and an English muffin. They work great for sandwiches too. I used real eggs, but I am thinking next time I should try the egg replacer to get a denser more English muffin like texture. Either way they were good and really easy to make. I looked up some other recipes for gf English muffins and this one had far less ingredients involved which was a bonus. By the way, I couldn't find muffin rings when I was at the store, but they did have panckae/egg rings. They worked just fine so if you have those...use em'!

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  71. Thank you! These were delicious! I used my regular gluten-free flour (6 parts rice flour, 2 parts arrowroot flour, and 1 part potato flour), real eggs, skim milk, and guar gum - it all worked well.

    thanks again! Mary

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  72. hi! i'm gluten free, but not vegan, so i'm wondering how i can substitute the egg replacers and dairy-free milk with eggs and milk. just wondering about the proportions :) thanks! i love the recipes you come up with!

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  73. Kittiness, You can use one or two organic free-range eggs and sub cow milk for the non-dairy milk in this recipe. (See Mary's comment above- she said it worked well.) I've tried both ways with many of my recipes (my husband eats eggs and dairy) and there's been no issues. Eggs will make GF baked goods lighter and higher. If you like a more dense English muffin, try one egg. Take care! Karina

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  74. Wondering if there is anyway I could do it without yeast? Could I just add some baking soda?? :-)

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  75. Nathan, I think a blend of baking powder and baking soda would work. Try 1.5 teaspoons baking powder with .5 (half) teaspoon baking soda. Are you using an egg? That will help it rise. I'd also add a .5 (half) teaspoon lemon juice to help the baking soda. Karina

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  76. I am supposed to avoid potatoes so I'm wondering if there is any substitute for the potato starch...I'm also supposed to avoid cornstarch...I am feeling so frustrated because I'm not sure if arrow root or tapioca flour/starch will work in as many baking recipes....

    heather (at) heatherbrandt (dot) com

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  77. Heather- Yes, tapioca starch works great in my recipes. Keep it in the fridge for freshness. I use Bob's Red Mill brand (they call it Tapioca Flour). xox Karina

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  78. Tracy13:51

    Wonderful recipe can't wait to try it for my son. I'm off to find english muffin rings. My mine is rolling with ideas...mini pizza??

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  79. Anonymous13:57

    Hi Karina. Thank you for sharing your recipes! I love them.

    Since I do not tolerate millet, what would you advise as a good substitute? I don't want to compromise the final results.

    Thanks again.

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  80. Tracy- Mini pizzas would be fab. xox

    Anon- Trade out the millet flour for a medium weight flour such as buckwheat (if you like buckwheat) or almond flour. Fine brown rice flour will also work. I'd stay away from strong tasting flours like quinoa or teff. Or- another option is to up the sorghum/potato starch combo and use equal parts of 1 1/4 cups each to make the total 2 1/2 cups flour blend. xox

    Karina

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  81. Hi GFG,

    Do you know of any substitutes for xanthan gum? My BF seems to be sensitive not only to gluten, but also to this substance, which seems to rule out many products like bread from GF bakeries :(

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  82. Undercover Princess, You can try using a little bit of guar gum instead- it accomplishes the same thing (increasing viscosity and binding). An extra egg white, whipped, can also be used. Or a tablespoon of arrowroot starch. Some use a tablespoon of honey or agave to help. Some use a touch of gelatin, but I think it makes the end result a little weird. Karina

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  83. Hi Karina,

    There are a lot of posts here, so I hope I'm not repeating anyone, but what about using oat flour in place of the millet flour? I have a bag in my cupboard from a really yummy banana bread recipe, but most other recipes do not call for it. I enjoyed the taste and am looking for a way to use it more. Would you call it a medium weight flour, like millet, or would you say it is heavier, like you described earlier with quinoa and teff?

    Thanks, and *LOVE* your blog! Check it every day!
    ~Kristina

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  84. Karina...yours is a wonderful site and you have provided me with numerable ideas...I recall my grandmother using vinegar in her pie crust recipe VERY FLAKY when cooked (that's decades ago - I'm 62) anyway I have been adding about 1-2 tablespoons of cidar vinegar to my bread and roll recipes and believe it or not everything is so much lighter. Give it a try. I have a feeling it just might work to reduce the denseness of gluten free breads.

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  85. What a great recipe! It's nice to discover an old favourite. It's certainly generating a lot of excitement with everyone!

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  86. Shawna08:04

    What a buzz these created!!! I'm super excited to give 'em a whirl!
    My daughters are crazy mad about you Karina...as am I! :)

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  87. Sera21:52

    I have done a recipe by Annalise Roberts but can't wait to try this version with millet flour! I use pineapple cans which are the perfect size and height and place them on a baking stone with corn meal or any meal that is grainy (quinoa works too). My batter comes out airy and rises nicely. a tip on corn allergy: I find I do OK with organic (i.e. nonGMO) corn but have terrible reactions to "any old" corn. Generally it is the proteins we are allergic to and GM modifies the protein structure of the plant.

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  88. These look amazing Karina! I refer everyone I know who is GF to your site!

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  89. Yeast-free version - So I started making these, thinking I had yeast, then realized that what I had was old and it didn't "proof" successfully. So I experimented....and they still came out GREAT!

    I replaced some of the water/milk mixture with a 1/3 cup of water kefir grains and then I added a squeeze of lemon (about half a lemon) and baking soda. I also used real eggs and blended all the wet ingredients in my Blend Tec. Because there is no yeast, it doesn't need to sit in the warm oven so you just bake and eat, yum!

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  90. Zabrina08:16

    That was my favorite breakfast too! My mom used to drizzle it with honey and dust a little powdered sugar on as well! I am going GF this week. I have been reading alot about some symtpoms I have had my whole life and all signs point to a gluten intolerance. I spoke to hubby about it and he is 100% on board. Wish me luck! Thanks for this great site! I am making my shopping list based on all of your yummy looking recipes!

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  91. can i substitute agar gum for the xanthan gum?

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  92. Shael, I have no idea. Never used it. If you have, perhaps your experience can guide you. Karina

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  93. Hello Karina,
    Love your recipes and pics too which leads me to ask - what camera and lens do you use? Also, I can't find sorghum flour here in Oz. If anyone knows where in Melbourne to find it, can they please leave a post here. What can I use in the meantime?
    Mia - Melbourne, Australia.

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  94. Forgot to mention. To the person who was looking for Tapioca starch in Australia - it can be found at Value Health.

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  95. This was a "tada moment" A look at me! I did it moment, like when a child learns to walk. Can't belive I actually made these! Hats off to you for amazing instructions! Well done my new cooking coach friend. Well done.
    Dancing in the kitchen!

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  96. Anonymous13:11

    I made these for Thanksgiving morning - they were FANTASTIC!! I served them with my homemade raspberry peach jam- YUMMY! Even the 'gluten-tolerant' in the house thought they were good!! Thanks for such a great recipe. Oh, & since I didn't have 'English muffin rings', I used wide mouth canning rings!!

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  97. I made these as directed - I bought the stupid rings... I wanted them THAT MUCH
    Tapioca Starch, Almond milk, agave.
    OMG... I ate 4 the first day...
    two the next... Two made it to the freezer - for two days.
    I'm making some tomorrow because it's almost midnight and I'm a bit too tired to stay up that long tonight.

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  98. Thank you Karina for providing this awesome recipe. My husband and I made these tonight and I could not stop eating just one, but two.

    We have started trying to live the Primal Blueprint lifestyle and it require us to cut back on wheat and carbs significantly.

    I am 100% sure this will be one of the recipes that I will make quite often!

    Thanks again!

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  99. Wow these are so awesome! I didn't have the English muffin rings so I used pineapple cans and they worked perfectly. I used one egg instead of the egg replacer and unsweetened almond milk. I only had four rings so I made four muffins and used the rest of the dough to make a foccacia-type bread -- I just added garlic and onion powder, cracked black pepper, and sun-dried tomatoes. The loaf is still cooling, but I already ate one of the muffins with some red pepper jelly and it was FANTASTIC. I'll probably make another batch of these tonight to freeze for breakfasts this week. Thanks so much for sharing! The next thing I want to make are GF bagels -- do you have a recipe? I couldn't find one when I searched your site.

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    Replies
    1. I need to create a bagel recipe... And that sounds fabulous- what you did as a focaccia!

      Delete
  100. Jules13:33

    Yosemite Baker- I would think using less starch and more millet flour might make the product less chewy and more tender, not vice versa? Did you try it? If so, how did it work?

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  101. Alyson02:50

    I tried the suggestion to make this in a loaf pan. Maybe I did something wrong, but it turned out slightly too moist. However, it was still the absolute best sandwich bread I've ever made. Period. I will try a little less liquid next time (not sure why it did that for me), but we have eaten 2/3 of the loaf in the past two hours! SO GOOD.

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  102. These look so good! I recently made some using my electric skillet, but they came out toasted on the bottom, which my hubby enjoys, but I prefer them softer. I will definitely have to try it your way, in the oven next time. These look store bought! Very well done on your persistence! I tried creating one recipe without yeast, but gave up on that for now. Thanks as usual!

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  103. Anonymous15:13

    I can have egg whites but not yolks. Can I leave out the yolks in this recipe?
    Melissa

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  104. HELP! I made these the first time and perfection and I have tried now 4 times and they collapse every time! The only thing I can think is not cooing them long enough? I did 20, 23 and I can't remember how long I cooked them the first time. They look beautiful in the oven, tall, firm and then they collapse when I take them out. I can't check them bc once I open the door and pull them out they start collapsing already. Ugh

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    Replies
    1. Sounds like the oven might be off a bit- and you need to bake them a bit longer. One difference- ambient temperature? A hot kitchen will be hotter- than a cold kitchen. Summer vs winter baking?

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  105. Made these last night and loved them for breakfast this morning! Thanks Karina!

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  106. Looks like it turned out fantastic!

    Quick Question: On one of your 'how to go gluten-free' pages you provided a a base flour mix substitute. Is it possible to use that in replacement for this recipe?

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    Replies
    1. The template I suggest has various options- so- depending upon your options- it could work. I personally like this combo of flours for these muffins... but you could experiment.

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  107. K, WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU DON'T USE THE GUM? MY GUT CAN'T HANDLE THE STUFF- AND ON LOW FODMAP WAY OF EATING...CAN SUB SUGAR FOR AGAVE/HONEY. E

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  108. I used canning jar rings as well and had leftover batter, which I put in a loaf pan. It's all rising now. I can't wait to taste them! I have my bacon all ready for my much - anticipated egg sandwich. :)

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  109. I followed your recipe, used canning jar rings for molds. I had dough left over and it's baking as a loaf. The muffins are perfectly delicious! I enjoyed my bacon and egg sandwich. Thank you for this recipe!

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Welcome to Gluten-Free Goddess® Recipes. Comments are moderated and will appear on approval.

Find substitution help and guidelines here. Please note: substitutions alter the recipe (and may affect structure, texture, baking times, and flavor).

Find my gluten-free baking tips and advice here.

Find sugar-free baking tips here.

Wishing you a delicious and beautiful day!

Karina - Gluten-Free Goddess xox


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