2009-02-19

Scalloped Potatoes - Vegan + Dairy-Free

Dairy free scalloped potatoes vegan style comfort food


Creamy vegan scalloped potatoes...


On a whim and out of nowhere (and at 2:54 AM, I'll have you know) I began conjuring images of creamy scalloped potatoes. Odd for someone who must avoid cheese and cream and butter and who- most days- is reconciled to her cheese-free life with a shrugging Lebowski-Zen detachment they write books about. Not to mention, it's been (literally) over a decade since I made this retro recipe, cream or no cream. Alas, I simply couldn't get the idea out of my sleepy Ewan McGregor-esque spiky head. 

The vegan scalloped potato challenge bit me. And refused to let go.

To make my pre-dawn vision a reality this classic recipe would need some serious tweaking. I mean, it's not just cheese you have to replace (and I'm no fan of plastic vegan cheeses, let me tell you). There is cream. And sweet moo-cow butter. Three key ingredients that make this comfy dish so melt-in-your-mouth delicious. Lucky for me I happened to have some dairy-free cream sauce left over from a vegan pasta I had tossed together the night before. A thick and silky hemp based sauce featuring artichokes and wine.

Accident? Destiny? Or simply the collective unconscious zeroing in on post-midnight potato cravings when your serotonin is dropping so fast your heart beat skips and triggers a hot flash?

You decide.



Scalloped potatoes- all yum, zero dairy.

Dairy-Free Scalloped Potatoes Recipe

To keep this recipe vegan, I used creamy Soy Dream Original in my white sauce, but dairy-free almond or hazelnut milk would also work. Or unsweetened coconut milk in cartons. If you have a gluten-free dairy-free "Parm" you like, sprinkle it on top of the potatoes before baking.

Ingredients:

4 medium gold potatoes, scrubbed
Sea salt
2 tablespoons light olive oil
2 tablespoons rice flour
2 1/2 cups unsweetened soy or non-dairy milk
3 tablespoons GF nutritional yeast flakes
2 tablespoons sesame tahini or raw almond or cashew butter
2 teaspoons minced onion
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon sea salt, or more, to taste
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon gluten-free Dijon or honey mustard
1 tablespoon golden balsamic vinegar, rice vinegar, or lemon juice- to taste
1/4 cup white wine, to taste (may omit)
1 cup frozen artichoke hearts, thawed, chopped

Instructions:

Boil a pot of salted water. Slice the potatoes thin and parboil them for 5 minutes; drain.

In a saucepan, heat the olive oil over medium heat, and stir in the rice flour (I use a whisk to do this). Cook and stir the flour for about 30 seconds- it will make thick paste- and continue stirring to cook the raw flour taste out of it.

Slowly add in the soy milk, whisking to blend.

Bring the mixture to a bubble (it will thicken as it heats) then reduce the heat to low. Add the nutritional yeast, tahini, onion, galic, sea salt, nutmeg, mustard, vinegar, white wine; whisk to blend. Add in the chopped artichokes.

Continue heating and stirring the sauce over gentle heat for about five to ten minutes till thickened. Remove from heat.

Preheat the oven to 350ºF.

Assemble your dish:

Rub a clove of raw garlic in a gratin style shallow baking dish or casserole. Layer about half of the sliced potatoes in the bottom of the dish. Pour half the sauce over this layer. Press down a bit, making sure the sauce seeps in and around all the slices. Add in the remaining potatoes and pour the rest of the sauce all over the top. Press down a bit and shimmy the edges to allow the sauce to sneak in all around the edges.

Cover and bake for 50 minutes in the center of a 350ºF oven. Then uncover and bake for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, until the potatoes are fork tender.

Serves 4.

Recipe Source: glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

All images & content are copyright protected, all rights reserved. Please do not use our images or content without prior permission. Thank you. 


More potato recipes from food bloggers:

See Nicole's tempting Butternut Squash and Sweet Potato Gratin recipe at Pinch My Salt.

For a moo-cow dairy cream and butter version of scalloped potatoes, see Elise's Scalloped Potatoes Recipe at Simple Recipes.

Susan at FatFree Vegan Kitchen also has a gluten-free dairy-free version of Creamy Scalloped Potatoes.

For a tasty potato alternative, see Amy's Double Stuffed Baked Potato recipe at Cooking With Amy.



43 comments:

  1. Even without all the cream and butter and cheese, it still sounds and looks delicious!!hmm..i think im having a noon-vision for scalloped potatoes :P
    ( PS:I am scATmirchmasala following you on twitter)

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  2. This looks unbelievably delicious - so much so that I'll be picking what I'm missing in ingredients and making this as soon as possible. Stroke of genius to use tahini for the creaminess. I can't wait to make this. LOVE artichoke.

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  3. Those look lovely! I make vegan scalloped potatoes too (without cheese alternatives) and actually, my family prefers them to the traditional!

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  4. I looooove this recipe :) Potatoes are the best winter comfort food!

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  5. Thanks for linking to my recipe, though my photo looks shoddy compared to your beautiful dish (which sounds terrific!) Also, I love your new blog design!

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  6. Anonymous16:49

    Oh, yum! And me w a quart of hemp dream, just lookin' for a purpose!

    What "good tasting" mutritional yeast do you recommend?

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  7. My honey adores scalloped potoates, but I haven't made them in years because I don't eat dairy. These sounds wonderful! Can't wait to try them!

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  8. Mmmm they look amazing!

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  9. I am keeping an eye out for this hemp dream you use all the time, Karina! I have never seen the unsweetened kind at Whole Foods, so I will ask the manager. Your cheese free sauce is awesome, and I make it all the time 'cause it's so much cheaper than organic cheddar and just as tasty! It's wonderful over spaghetti squash.

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  10. Now I have a new recipe to try this weekend! I have always liked scalloped potatoes and have missed them. I totally understand the Zen detachment, but sometimes you just really need the thing you want. Thank you for making the foods that I didn't know I wanted possible.

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  11. Anonymous01:28

    Where do you find gluten-free nutritional yeast, I have not been able to find any?? This recipe sounds yummy!

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  12. Do you think soy milk would work? I don't know if I can even find hemp milk here.

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  13. This sounds good, slightly different from the other vegan scalloped potato recipes I have tried. The balsamic addition sounds interesting, and very intriguing. I'm definitley going to make this the next time I make scalloped potatoes!Thanks for the recipe.

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  14. Anonymous11:38

    I know that this is off the topic but I am new to this
    gf world. My fav granola has oats and barley malt.
    Do they have gluetins? The manufacturer does not know?

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  15. KimboJo12:47

    Karina: My son is allergic to yeast. Is nutritional yeast similar to the yeast used to make bread rise? I have not been able to determine this via my own research. Keep up the great work you do! Love your recipes.

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  16. Anonymous14:41

    I'm not a vegan, but I've seen nutritional yeast in recipes all the time. What does nutritional yeast do for a recipe and what happens if that is omitted, especially for this recipe?

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  17. Anonymous14:45

    OK, I found my answer on nutritional yeast, but you can add to that if you want. For others who have question on nutritional yeast, here it is:

    http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/vegetarian_cooking_lifestyle/64290

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  18. Thanks everyone for the enthusiastic response to my scalloped potatoes. I will warn you, you may not be able to eat only one serving (I ate two!). xox

    Questions regarding the nutritional yeast:

    I use KAL Nutritional Yeast Flakes- Fortified (important for B vitamins we all need- vegans and celiacs especially).

    Says Gluten Free and Vegan Friendly on the front label. Also: candida albicans free.

    Nutritional yeast is not brewer's yeast.

    Question on oats in granola and barley malt:

    Non-certified commercial oats are not gluten-free (most likely due to cross contamination); use only certified gluten-free oats.

    Barley malt aka malt is NOT gluten-free; it often used for processing or sweetening. It is NOT safe for celiacs.

    Karina

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  19. This looks great Karina! I am a huge fan of potatoes and scalloped potatoes was a favorite dish of mine when I was a kid. I will have to give this recipe a try.

    Thanks! -Ali :)

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  20. Unbelievable! These look so tasty and now freedom, freedom to eat such goodness without the heaviness of dairy :)

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  21. Looks AWESOME! Can't wait to try! But first...two questions...

    1. I'm out of plain Nflakes...do you think I could use the vegan parm?

    2. I don't know much about artichokes (except they taste awesome!). I don't have frozen on hand but I do have canned. Is that kinda the same or do I need to do some shopping first?

    Thanks!!!

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  22. Anon- I missed your yeast question when I was busy writing a response:
    nutritional yeast is an excellent source for B vitamins (often missing in gluten-free grains because usually GF cereals/breads/grains are not fortified the way wheat/cereals are).

    It also gives a sauce like this a nutty kinda "cheesy" taste.

    Ali and Angie- Thanks so much! :-)

    For the Love of My Bugs- Well- to be honest, I think the nutritional yeast adds not only flavor and body it gives us the fortified B vitamins so important. The vegan "Parm" and "cheeses" aren't very flavorful or nutritionally rich.

    As for artichokes- the canned taste a bit "tinny" to me- I much prefer frozen; but if that's all you have, rinse them in cold water; drain well and chop. They will work.

    Thanks, everyone!

    Karina

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  23. I think the thing I love about vegan recipes is that they almost always turn out healthier than the non-vegan original. These look great! I might try to fool my family with them when I go home to visit, although it might not be so easy sneaking nutritional yeast into the house...

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  24. Hi Joanne- Thank you. I'm not so sure these would fool butter and cream eating folks, but for those of us living gluten and casein free they sure are tasty!

    Karina

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  25. This looks amazing, but its your white sauce that really caught my attention. I've been wanting to make moussaka, but have had to delay gratification because of the traditional bechamel. I think this sauce would work great, what do you think?

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  26. Eat at Joe's- This vegan sauce is a great base sauce for all kinds of recipes. I use various versions of it for mac and cheese, Alfredo sauce, etc. So why not? Add the Greek seasonings you like.

    Karina

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  27. Hi Karina,

    Wow! Good info on nutritional yeast. I'll look for some on my next visit to the health food store. I've been looking for a good source of vitamin B.

    BTW, I just tried your sorgum and millet bread recipe. Turned out great! And it's a lot less expensive than the one I make with powdered goat milk ($12 for a small can of the stuff!) This could become my new everyday bread.

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  28. I am in the midst of making this great-sounding recipe and realized that the recipe omitted the amount of paprika or turmeric. How much should I add? Thanks.

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  29. Gluten Free Kay- Yay. So glad. I love this bread, too. Thanks!

    Margarete- Oopsie. Actually, I forgot because to list it in this version because I didn't color the sauce (I wanted it white).

    You can sprinkle in either paprika or turmeric for color, a little bit, to taste. Not much, though.

    Karina

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  30. Thanks for clearing up the paprika confusion in time for dinner tonight. BUT, Baking temp is not mentioned so I am assuming 350 for the time you give? Thanks again.
    Margarete, who may become your pain in the rear!

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  31. My bad. Again. All fixed. You must forgive me.

    Where is my head?

    Maybe it's under the bed with the dust bunnies.

    xox

    Karina

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  32. Just in time to pop it in the oven! Thanks Karina for saving my dinner! Will post a review tomorrow!!!

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  33. I love, LOVE this sauce. The end of the season brussels sprouts are getting a coating this week. Maybe potatoes will be up next. Thanks for the new idea!

    Margaret

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  34. From the bottom of my gluten-free, dairy-free heart: thank you, thank you, thank you! I have not had scalloped potatoes in years and am looking forward to making this.

    You rock Karina!

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  35. Karina -

    I usually never make other chef's recipes. I always create my own from whatever inspires me that day. But this time I did, I made your sauce for lunch today. We tossed it with brown rice spirals. It was so yummy! I used sweet rice flour for the 2 tbls of flour. And since we normally do not have wine in the house I used 2 tbls of white wine vinegar in place of the wine and balsamic vinegar. I only used a pinch of nutmeg, I thought 1/4 tsp may be too much for my tastes.

    My girls would not try this (they have not been raised eating dairy and so do not have tastes for it or its replacements) but my 14 month twins loved it!! I also tossed in some frozen peas into our bowls, the hot sauce cooked them just right.

    I still have some sauce leftover, so I think I might try a small batch of scalloped potatoes tonight!

    Thanks Again! -Ali :)

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  36. As promised a couple of days ago, I am reporting back after making this for dinner (with roast pork, red cabbage, and broccolini). It was a great success. I did not substitute anything except that I used a can of artichoke hearts (rinsed and rinsed) in place of frozen. The only thing that I could have improved upon was to use more potatoes. I had an excess of sauce or maybe just undersized potatoes! It's worth the effort, so go ahead and give it a try. I can see using the sauce in all sorts of other ways, with pasta and veggies. Thanks Karina!

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  37. These look good. I've never even had 'real' scallop potatoes but I definitely want to try these!

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  38. Margaret- and Liz--

    My pleasure! :-)

    Ali- Cool. I'm an original fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants cook, too. My new recipes are based on my old recipes- it's half the fun- continually evolving...

    ;-)

    Margarete- Very cool! Thanks for stopping back to share. I use this basic sauce on ALL kinds of things. It's very versatile.

    Steph- Well- what are you waiting for? ;-)

    Thanks, everyone- you rock! xox

    Karina

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  39. It's not that I didn't think this recipe would be amazing, simply because everything I have tried from Karina (and I have tried many) has been, but these scalloped potatoes were incredible! These are a definite do-again. And for once in my life, I didn't even feel the need to switch-up the recipe in any way- soooo very yummy! :)

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  40. This is one of the most delicious recipes I've ever tasted. My husband and I just celebrated our 23rd anniversary and I prepared Karina's Butternut Squash/Sweet Potato Gratin. WOW! We topped our meal off with Flourless Chocolate Cake. A perfect meal to celebrate wedded bliss and continued excellent health! Thanks Karina!

    Elayne Lieberman, Simi Valley, CA

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  41. im an avid non-vegan... and i decided to make this for a dinner party at a vegan household. it did not dissapoint. nice!!

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  42. Anonymous07:52

    We are non-drinkers. Should I just leave the wine out or make a substitution? Will canned artichokes rinsed in filtered water work?

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  43. I used your recipe for a base and made a slightly different version. Thanks for posting the recipe (and I linked back to yours on my site).

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